Planting for Future Generations - Environmental Justice in Guatemala with Jorge Armando Lopez Pocol of the Chico Mendes Reforestation Project Monday March 9, 4PM Cesar Chavez room 405 the University of Arizona

Date: 

Wed, 03/04/2015 - 16:00

Planting for Future Generations - Environmental Justice in Guatemala
with Jorge Armando Lopez Pocol of the Chico Mendes Reforestation Project

Monday March 9, 4PM
Cesar Chavez room 405
the University of Arizona
(campus map: http://map.arizona.edu/)

Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the School of Geography and Development, the School of Anthropology and the Department of History

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From the greater contexts of environmental justice, climate change,
and indigenous peoples’ struggle for survival and sovereignty, this
presentation will highlight the work of community activist Jorge
Armando Lopez Pocol and the Chico Mendes Reforestation Project in
Pachaj, a Maya K’iche’ village in Guatemala.  The Project began in
1998 as an idea conceived by Jorge Armando and two friends who had
become disillusioned with the politics of their local government and
created a new environmental initiative with a focus on the
reforestation of nearby community lands.

It began with a small tree nursery near Jorge Armando's home in
Pachaj—an area highly impacted by heavy logging, mining, agriculture
and the deforestation done during the Civil War of the 1980s. Later
the project was renamed the "Chico Mendes Reforestation Project" in
honor of the famous environmental activist who was murdered while
defending the Amazonian rain forest.   In addition to continuously
working to carefully reforest the mountains of his community, the
Project partners with approximately 400 students from the local middle
school to teach environmental awareness through nature walks, tree
planting activities, and plant care.  The project also hosts
international volunteers and a Spanish language immersion school.

Please join Jorge Armando to learn about Chico Mendes Reforestation
Project and also the environmental crisis in Central America created
by civil war, international free trade agreements, and continued
social repression.  This presentation is a part of a speaking tour
that will serve to garner financial support for the project through
donations and honorariums, outreach to potential Spanish language
school students and volunteers, and awareness building.

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